That looks off, mate: why craft beer lovers are falling for murky ales – The Guardian

Shortcuts New techniques producing hazy, unfiltered beers preserve flavour and add silken textures, claim brewers. But how can you tell if you’ve been sold a bad pint? Appetising … a pint of Cloudwater, a murky craft beer Shortcuts That looks off, mate: why craft beer lovers are falling for murky ales New techniques producing hazy, unfiltered beers preserve flavour and add silken textures, claim brewers. But how can you tell if you’ve been sold a bad pint?

For decades, there has been a transparent consensus among beer drinkers that a perfect pint must look crystal-clear. But as Britain begins to embrace murky beer, that shibboleth suddenly looks shaky.

From Cornwall’s Verdant Brewing to Pilot in Edinburgh, many UK breweries are now making opaque, milky-looking beers. “Murky” is a blossoming cult phenomenon, complete with its own backlash (#murkshaming) and ardent critics. Nonetheless, in craft beer bars, murk is fast becoming the new normal.

In Manchester, Cloudwater brewery produces an array of turbid beers that, far from the idealised pin-bright pint, resemble fruit juice, chicken stock or, naysayers snort, muddy water. You could take one look at a Cloudwater beer, (wrongly) deem it off and send it back. However, the firm’s Paul Jones says that among craft beer fans who no longer “drink with their eyes”, murky beer is “setting the marketplace alight”. Why? Flavour, basically. In

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