Seven truly terrible pieces of fantasy football advice – NFL.com

In case you haven’t seen or heard the news, I’m leaving my job with NFL Fantasy this summer.

My impending departure from the NFL has pushed me into a period of profound reflection. From having my work read by millions to appearing on NFL Network to attending two Super Bowls with my dad, this has been an unbelievable opportunity that I’ll forever look back on fondly.

However, I’m not writing this article as a retrospective on my “glory” days with the NFL. Who would want to read that? (Answer: No one.) No, I figured one of my final columns for NFL Fantasy should be something special.

That’s why this is not a “look at my cool job” or “thanks for the memories” self-aggrandizing post. Rather, it’s a chance to celebrate our shared pain, misery, and some “oh my word I’d forgotten about him” memories.

This … is a look back at my worst calls as a fantasy football analyst.

To the archives!

Throwing coal in the Toby Gerhart hype train fire

The fantasy football history books are littered with examples of backup running backs getting a featured role and launching into fantasy superstardom. The poster boy for this is Michael Turner, who spent four years behind LaDainian Tomlinson before becoming a total stud for the Falcons.

For many analysts, the writing was on the wall for Adrian Peterson‘s longtime backup, Toby Gerhart, to fulfill this prophecy and bring balance to the fantasy force once he signed a $10.5 million-dollar deal with the Jacksonville Jaguars. After all, Gerhart was a Heisman Trophy runner-up who flashed in limited opportunities with the Vikings. He was athletic, had fresh legs, and the Jaguars coaches were salivating over Gerhart in the offseason press:

     » “He’s a horse … I talked to one of his former

Read More Here...

This entry was posted in Football News. Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Your email address will never be published.