6000 detained after failed Turkish military coup, including commander of US-linked base – Fox News

Bryan Llenas discusses previous coup attempts and the role of the Turkish military

 

ISTANBUL –  Following a failed coup against Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the government moved swiftly Sunday to shore up his power and remove those perceived as an enemy, saying it has detained 6,000 people.

The crackdown targeted not only generals and soldiers, but a wide swath of the judiciary that has sometimes blocked Erdogan, raising concerns that the effort to oust him will push Turkey even further into authoritarian rule.

Friday night’s sudden uprising by a faction of the military appeared to take the government — and much of the world — by surprise.

The plotters sent warplanes firing on key government installations and tanks rolling into major cities, but it ended hours later when loyal government forces regained control of the military, and civilians took to the streets in support of Erdogan. At least 294 people were killed and more than 1,400 wounded, the government said.

On Sunday, Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said the coup had failed and life has returned to normal.

“Another calamity has been thwarted,” Yildirim said in Ankara after visiting state TRT television, which had been seized by soldiers supporting the coup. “However, our duty is not over. We shall rapidly conduct the cleansing operation so that they cannot again show the audacity of coming against the will of the people.”

Yildirim said those involved with the failed coup “will receive every punishment they deserve.” Erdogan suggested that Turkey might reinstate capital punishment, which was legally abolished in 2004 as part of the country’s bid to join the European Union.

Even before the weekend chaos in Turkey, the NATO member and key Western ally in the fight against the Islamic State group had been wracked by political turmoil that critics blamed on Erdogan’s increasingly heavy-handed rule. He has shaken up the government, cracked down on dissent, restricted the media and renewed fighting with Kurdish rebels.

Speaking to a large crowd of supporters in front of his Istanbul residence Sunday evening, Erdogan responded to frequent calls of “We want the death penalty!” by saying: “We hear your request. In a democracy, whatever the people want they will get.”

Grief-stricken relatives in Ankara and Istanbul buried those killed in the coup attempt, and prayers for the dead were read simultaneously at noon Sunday at Turkey’s 85,000 mosques. Erdogan attended a funeral for his campaign manager Erol Olcak and his 16-year-old son, Abdullah Tayyip Olcak. The president wept and vowed to take the country forward in “unity and solidarity.”

The government’s announcement that 6,000 people had been detained — including three top generals and hundreds of soldiers — suggested a wide conspiracy. Observers said the scale of the crackdown, especially against the judiciary, indicated the government was taking the opportunity to further consolidate Erdogan’s power.

“The factions within the military opposed to Erdogan who did this just gave him carte blanche to crack down not only on the military but on the judiciary,” said Aykan Erdemir, a former lawmaker from the main opposition party and now a senior fellow at the U.S.-based Foundation for Defense of Democracies. “The coup plotters couldn’t have helped Erdogan more.”

The rapid suppression of the putsch was greeted by Turks across the political spectrum with opposition parties joining to condemn it. In a half-dozen cities, tens of thousands marched throughout the day after officials urged them to defend democracy and back Erdogan, Turkey’s top politician for 13 years.

At nightfall, flag-waving crowds rallied in Istanbul’s Taksim Square, Ankara’s Kizilay Square and elsewhere.

The Yeni Safak newspaper used the headline “Traitors of the country,” while the Hurriyet newspaper declared “Democracy’s victory.”

“Just a small group from Turkish armed forces stood up against our government … but we, the Turkish nation, stand together and repulse it back,” said Gozde Kurt, a 16-year-old student at a morning rally in Istanbul.

The failed coup and the subsequent crackdown followed moves by Erdogan to reshape both the military and the judiciary. He had indicated a shake-up of the military was imminent and had also taken steps to increase his influence over the judiciary.

This month, parliament approved a controversial bill to reform two Turkish high courts, which allows the government to dismiss hundreds of administrative and high appeals court judges and allow Erdogan to replace them with judges loyal to him. Parliament passed the bill even as authorities were grappling with a deadly triple suicide bomb attacks at Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport.

The opposition had appealed the legislation to the high court unsuccessfully, but Erdogan has not yet signed it into law. Two Constitutional Court justices were among the thousands of members of the judiciary it had detained Saturday.

It is not clear how the post-coup purge will affect the judiciary, how the government will move to replace the dismissed judges and prosecutors, or where the trials for those detained would be held.

The government alleged the coup conspirators were loyal to moderate U.S.-based cleric Fethullah Gulen, whom Erdogan has often accused of trying to overthrow the government.

Gulen, who lives in Saylorsburgh, Pennsylvania, espouses a philosophy that blends a mystical form of Islam with democracy. He is a former Erdogan ally turned bitter foe who has been put on trial in absentia in Turkey, where the government has labeled his movement a terrorist organization. He strongly denies the government’s charges.

At a funeral in Istanbul, Erdogan vowed to “clean all state institutions of the virus” of Gulen’s supporters. He also called on Washington to extradite Gulen.

At two weekend news conferences, Gulen strongly denied any role in or knowledge of the coup.

“As someone who suffered under multiple military coups during the past five decades, it is especially insulting to be accused of having any link to such an attempt,” he said.

Gulen even raised the possibility the coup attempt had been staged, saying it had “all the signs of a movie scenario,” in order to purge the military of Erdogan’s opponents.

In recent years, the government has moved to purge the police and judiciary of Gulen followers. The military, founded on secularist ideals, has been a staunch opponent of Gulen.

Gulen told reporters he did not fear extradition.

“This doesn’t worry me at all. But I’m not going to do anything that will harm my dignity or that will go against my dignity,” he said.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said the United States would entertain an extradition request for Gulen, but Turkey would have to present “legitimate evidence that withstands scrutiny.” So far, officials have not offered evidence he was involved.

Ziya Meral of the Centre for Historical Analysis and Conflict Research, a civilian think tank affiliated with the British Defense Ministry, said the motives of the plotters remain unclear, but the allegations against Gulen were dubious.

“I am more inclined toward a network within the armed services who were disturbed about where Turkey is heading,” she said.

The allegations will only add to the pressure on the U.S. government and signal new uncertainty in U.S.-Turkish relations.

The putsch attempt led to a temporary halt to air operations by the U.S.-led coalition against the Islamic State group in neighboring Syria and Iraq from Turkey’s Incerlik air base, but the Pentagon said Sunday that Turkey has reopened its airspace.

A Turkish government official said that the commander of the base, Gen. Bekir Ercan Van, was among those detained.

The state-run Anadolu Agency also said authorities issued a warrant for the arrest of Erdogan’s top military aide, Col. Ali Yazici, although it wasn’t clear what role he may have played.

The agency said 70 generals and admirals, including former Gen. Akin Ozturk, an air Force commander, were detained. Of the generals and admirals brought before court, 11 were put under arrest as of Sunday night and the rest are awaiting processing.

Security forces arrested a group of alleged plotters who had been holding out at one of Istanbul’s airports Sunday, a Turkish official said. In addition, Anadolu reported that seven people, including a colonel, were detained at an air base in the central Anatolian city of Konya.

Gen. Umit Dunda said at least 104 conspirators were among those killed, describing them as mainly officers from the air force, the military police and armored units.

Security forces rounded up 52 more military officers for alleged links to the coup. Anadolu said a detention order has been issued for 110 judges and prosecutors in Istanbul alone for alleged involvement with the group responsible for the coup.

The suspects are being charged with “membership in an armed terrorist organization” and “attempting to overthrow the government of the Turkish Republic using force and violence or attempting to completely or partially hinder its function.” The agency said 58 homes of prosecutors and judges have been searched.

Officials also said 2,745 judges and prosecutors have been dismissed.

Another 149 police were detained in Ankara, according to Anadolu, citing the office of the city’s governor.

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Europe|Erdogan Triumphs After Coup Attempt, but Turkey's Fate Is Unclear – New York Times

ISTANBUL — Standing atop a bus outside his mansion in Istanbul on Saturday night, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, victorious after putting down a coup attempt by renegade factions of the military, told his followers, “We only bow to God.”

The symbolism was stark. The informal rally harked back to his days as an up-by-the-bootstraps populist and Islamist leader who often spoke from the tops of buses. And his message, cloaked in the language of Islam, underscored how much Turkey has changed in recent decades.

Members of the military, once the guardians of the country’s secular traditions who successfully pulled off three coups last century, were being rounded up and tossed in jail, and other perceived enemies were being purged from the state bureaucracy.

The Islamists, meanwhile, were dancing in the streets.

That is where, Mr. Erdogan said on Sunday, they would remain.

“This week is important,” he told a crowd gathered at Istanbul’s Fatih Mosque for a funeral for a person killed in the violence over the weekend. “We will not leave the public squares. This is not a 12-hour affair.”

The coup attempt seems to have been decisively quashed, with nearly 6,000 military personnel in custody. Funerals for many of the at least 265 people who died in clashes were taking place across Turkey on Sunday.

Now the country is left to consider what the lasting consequences of the uprising will be. While Mr. Erdogan has fended off a coup, the most urgent question is this: Has he emerged even more powerful, or is he now a weakened leader who must accommodate his opponents?

That much of the country, including those who have bitterly opposed his government, stood against a military coup as a violation of democracy has raised hopes that Mr. Erdogan will seize the moment to reach across Turkey’s many political divides and unite the country.

Yet as the weekend progressed, it was becoming clearer that for Mr. Erdogan and his religiously conservative followers, the moment was a triumph of political Islam more than anything else.

While secular and liberal Turks generally opposed the coup, it was Mr. Erdogan’s supporters who flooded the streets and gathered at Istanbul’s airport Saturday morning to push out the occupying army. They mostly yelled religious slogans and chants in support of Mr. Erdogan, not of democracy itself.

Interactive Feature | The Arc of a Coup Attempt in Turkey Here is a visual timeline of the country’s violent and chaotic insurrection.

After Mr. Erdogan’s speech on Saturday, thousands of his supporters marched down Istiklal Street in Istanbul to Taksim Square, mostly waving Turkish flags and shouting in support of their president.

It felt like a rollicking street carnival. Women in head scarves filled the square, a truck played a song about Mr. Erdogan, and passing motorists honked and waved flags.

That they were able to gather in public at all was significant, ample evidence that Turkey is, these days, for Mr. Erdogan and his supporters.

When other groups, like gay and lesbian organizations or labor unions, try to gather in public spaces in central Istanbul, the streets are sealed off. Armored vehicles with water cannons suddenly materialize, as do police officers with tear gas canisters.

“It was nice here today,” said Ali Tuysuz, 19, who was selling watermelon slices on Saturday in Taksim. “People are happy and buying watermelon. My tray was emptied three times. President Erdogan will protect the country.”

Map | Turkey

The mosques’ role in mobilizing citizens to gather in the streets as the coup was unfolding was decisive, but it nonetheless unsettled many secular Turks. They called it a historic sidestep of Turkey’s secular principles, in which religion is meant to be separate from politics.

On Sunday, Turkey’s nearly 85,000 mosques, in unison, blared from their loudspeakers a prayer traditionally recited for martyrs who have died in war and called for people to continue to rally against the plotters of the coup.

“Most of the people who went out in the streets to oppose the coup d’état did not use democratic language,” said Ozgur Unluhisarcikli, the director of the Ankara office of the German Marshall Fund of the United States, a research organization.

“There are people for whom Islam plays a big role in their lives in Turkey,” he added. “And there are people for whom Islam plays no role.”

As Turks waited to see in which direction their mercurial and powerful leader would steer the country in the wake of the coup attempt, Mr. Erdogan struck some conciliatory notes on Sunday. Yet he has also raised the possibility that Turkey would reinstate the death penalty, which it had abolished as a part of its pursuit to join the European Union.

“If they have guns and tanks, we have faith,” said Mr. Erdogan, who also attended a funeral of a friend who was killed, and was seen crying. “We are not after revenge. So let us think before taking each step. We will act with reason and experience.”

Nigar Goksel, a senior Turkey analyst for the International Crisis Group, said there were two possible directions. “Either Erdogan utilizes this incident to redesign institutions in Ankara to his own benefit,” she said, “or he takes the opportunity with the solidarity that was extended to him by the opposition and different segments of society to reciprocate by investing more genuinely in rule of law and legitimate forms of dissent.”

Mr. Erdogan’s history suggests the latter possibility is unlikely. Each time he has faced a challenge to his power, from street protests three years ago to a corruption investigation that went after his inner circle, he has sidelined his enemies and become more autocratic.

Already, even as the government has arrested thousands of soldiers and officers who allegedly took part in the failed coup, there were signs that it was using the moment to widen a crackdown on perceived enemies. Alongside the military, the government also dismissed thousands of judges, who seemingly had no role to play in a military revolt.

“Now the government has a free hand to design the bureaucracy as they like, and they will,” Mr. Unluhisarcikli said. “All in all, Turkey will become a country where power is more consolidated and dissent will be more difficult.”

Interactive Feature | Today’s Headlines: European Morning Get news and analysis from Europe and around the world delivered to your inbox every day in the European morning.

As the purge of the military continued on Sunday, one of those arrested was Gen. Bekir Ercan Van, the chief of Incirlik Air Base, from which the United States military flies missions over Iraq and Syria against the Islamic State. Over the weekend, General Van approached American officials seeking asylum but was refused, according to a person with knowledge of the matter who spoke anonymously because of the sensitive nature of the subject.

The Greek prime minister, Alexis Tsipras, told Mr. Erdogan that the government would swiftly examine asylum claims by eight Turkish officers who fled to northern Greece in a helicopter and were detained on charges of illegal entry. Turkey has demanded their extradition.

As the drama of the coup attempt played out Friday and into Saturday morning, it looked for a moment as if Mr. Erdogan was on the verge of being toppled from power. The president spoke to the nation via the FaceTime app on his iPhone after he narrowly escaped being captured by mutinous soldiers, who arrived in a helicopter at a seaside hotel where he was vacationing — just after he had departed.

Then, around 3:30 a.m., he landed in Istanbul, after a dangerous flight undertaken while the plotters still had fighter jets in the air — the surest sign that the revolt was failing.

But more than his dramatic arrival at the Istanbul airport, his confident speech on Saturday on top of the bus seemed to emphatically declare that he was back in charge.

Celebrations by his supporters continued on Sunday, with jubilant crowds marching through the streets of Istanbul.

“Look around you,” one of the supporters, Eytan Karatas, 37, a mechanic, said. “Look at these people. We are the real soldiers of this country, and we have a chief.”

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Europe|Erdogan Triumphs After Coup Attempt, but Turkey's Fate Is Unclear – New York Times

ISTANBUL — Standing atop a bus outside his mansion in Istanbul on Saturday night, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, victorious after putting down a coup attempt by renegade factions of the military, told his followers, “We only bow to God.”

The symbolism was stark. The informal rally harked back to his days as an up-by-the-bootstraps populist and Islamist leader who often spoke from the tops of buses. And his message, cloaked in the language of Islam, underscored how much Turkey has changed in recent decades.

Members of the military, once the guardians of the country’s secular traditions who successfully pulled off three coups last century, were being rounded up and tossed in jail, and other perceived enemies were being purged from the state bureaucracy.

The Islamists, meanwhile, were dancing in the streets.

That is where, Mr. Erdogan said on Sunday, they would remain.

“This week is important,” he told a crowd gathered at Istanbul’s Fatih Mosque for a funeral for a person killed in the violence over the weekend. “We will not leave the public squares. This is not a 12-hour affair.”

The coup attempt seems to have been decisively quashed, with nearly 6,000 military personnel in custody. Funerals for many of the at least 265 people who died in clashes were taking place across Turkey on Sunday.

Now the country is left to consider what the lasting consequences of the uprising will be. While Mr. Erdogan has fended off a coup, the most urgent question is this: Has he emerged even more powerful, or is he now a weakened leader who must accommodate his opponents?

That much of the country, including those who have bitterly opposed his government, stood against a military coup as a violation of democracy has raised hopes that Mr. Erdogan will seize the moment to reach across Turkey’s many political divides and unite the country.

Yet as the weekend progressed, it was becoming clearer that for Mr. Erdogan and his religiously conservative followers, the moment was a triumph of political Islam more than anything else.

While secular and liberal Turks generally opposed the coup, it was Mr. Erdogan’s supporters who flooded the streets and gathered at Istanbul’s airport Saturday morning to push out the occupying army. They mostly yelled religious slogans and chants in support of Mr. Erdogan, not of democracy itself.

Interactive Feature | The Arc of a Coup Attempt in Turkey Here is a visual timeline of the country’s violent and chaotic insurrection.

After Mr. Erdogan’s speech on Saturday, thousands of his supporters marched down Istiklal Street in Istanbul to Taksim Square, mostly waving Turkish flags and shouting in support of their president.

It felt like a rollicking street carnival. Women in head scarves filled the square, a truck played a song about Mr. Erdogan, and passing motorists honked and waved flags.

That they were able to gather in public at all was significant, ample evidence that Turkey is, these days, for Mr. Erdogan and his supporters.

When other groups, like gay and lesbian organizations or labor unions, try to gather in public spaces in central Istanbul, the streets are sealed off. Armored vehicles with water cannons suddenly materialize, as do police officers with tear gas canisters.

“It was nice here today,” said Ali Tuysuz, 19, who was selling watermelon slices on Saturday in Taksim. “People are happy and buying watermelon. My tray was emptied three times. President Erdogan will protect the country.”

Map | Turkey

The mosques’ role in mobilizing citizens to gather in the streets as the coup was unfolding was decisive, but it nonetheless unsettled many secular Turks. They called it a historic sidestep of Turkey’s secular principles, in which religion is meant to be separate from politics.

On Sunday, Turkey’s nearly 85,000 mosques, in unison, blared from their loudspeakers a prayer traditionally recited for martyrs who have died in war and called for people to continue to rally against the plotters of the coup.

“Most of the people who went out in the streets to oppose the coup d’état did not use democratic language,” said Ozgur Unluhisarcikli, the director of the Ankara office of the German Marshall Fund of the United States, a research organization.

“There are people for whom Islam plays a big role in their lives in Turkey,” he added. “And there are people for whom Islam plays no role.”

As Turks waited to see in which direction their mercurial and powerful leader would steer the country in the wake of the coup attempt, Mr. Erdogan struck some conciliatory notes on Sunday. Yet he has also raised the possibility that Turkey would reinstate the death penalty, which it had abolished as a part of its pursuit to join the European Union.

“If they have guns and tanks, we have faith,” said Mr. Erdogan, who also attended a funeral of a friend who was killed, and was seen crying. “We are not after revenge. So let us think before taking each step. We will act with reason and experience.”

Nigar Goksel, a senior Turkey analyst for the International Crisis Group, said there were two possible directions. “Either Erdogan utilizes this incident to redesign institutions in Ankara to his own benefit,” she said, “or he takes the opportunity with the solidarity that was extended to him by the opposition and different segments of society to reciprocate by investing more genuinely in rule of law and legitimate forms of dissent.”

Mr. Erdogan’s history suggests the latter possibility is unlikely. Each time he has faced a challenge to his power, from street protests three years ago to a corruption investigation that went after his inner circle, he has sidelined his enemies and become more autocratic.

Already, even as the government has arrested thousands of soldiers and officers who allegedly took part in the failed coup, there were signs that it was using the moment to widen a crackdown on perceived enemies. Alongside the military, the government also dismissed thousands of judges, who seemingly had no role to play in a military revolt.

“Now the government has a free hand to design the bureaucracy as they like, and they will,” Mr. Unluhisarcikli said. “All in all, Turkey will become a country where power is more consolidated and dissent will be more difficult.”

Interactive Feature | Today’s Headlines: European Morning Get news and analysis from Europe and around the world delivered to your inbox every day in the European morning.

As the purge of the military continued on Sunday, one of those arrested was Gen. Bekir Ercan Van, the chief of Incirlik Air Base, from which the United States military flies missions over Iraq and Syria against the Islamic State. Over the weekend, General Van approached American officials seeking asylum but was refused, according to a person with knowledge of the matter who spoke anonymously because of the sensitive nature of the subject.

The Greek prime minister, Alexis Tsipras, told Mr. Erdogan that the government would swiftly examine asylum claims by eight Turkish officers who fled to northern Greece in a helicopter and were detained on charges of illegal entry. Turkey has demanded their extradition.

As the drama of the coup attempt played out Friday and into Saturday morning, it looked for a moment as if Mr. Erdogan was on the verge of being toppled from power. The president spoke to the nation via the FaceTime app on his iPhone after he narrowly escaped being captured by mutinous soldiers, who arrived in a helicopter at a seaside hotel where he was vacationing — just after he had departed.

Then, around 3:30 a.m., he landed in Istanbul, after a dangerous flight undertaken while the plotters still had fighter jets in the air — the surest sign that the revolt was failing.

But more than his dramatic arrival at the Istanbul airport, his confident speech on Saturday on top of the bus seemed to emphatically declare that he was back in charge.

Celebrations by his supporters continued on Sunday, with jubilant crowds marching through the streets of Istanbul.

“Look around you,” one of the supporters, Eytan Karatas, 37, a mechanic, said. “Look at these people. We are the real soldiers of this country, and we have a chief.”

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Erdogan Emerges Strong After Coup Attempt, but Turkey Awaits Next Steps – New York Times

ISTANBUL — Standing atop a bus outside his mansion in Istanbul on Saturday night, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, victorious after putting down a coup attempt by renegade factions of the military, told his followers, “We only bow to God.”

The symbolism was stark. The informal rally harked back to his days as an up-by-the-bootstraps populist and Islamist leader who often spoke from the tops of buses. And his message, cloaked in the language of Islam, underscored how much Turkey has changed in recent decades.

Members of the military, once the guardians of the country’s secular traditions who successfully pulled off three coups last century, were being rounded up and tossed in jail, and other perceived enemies were being purged from the state bureaucracy.

The Islamists, meanwhile, were dancing in the streets.

That is where, Mr. Erdogan said on Sunday, they would remain.

“This week is important,” he told a crowd gathered at Istanbul’s Fatih Mosque for a funeral for a person killed in the violence over the weekend. “We will not leave the public squares. This is not a 12-hour affair.”

Interactive Feature | The Arc of a Coup Attempt in Turkey A violent and chaotic insurrection began Friday night as two bridges in Istanbul were seized by military forces. In the hours that followed, factions fought for control of government buildings in the capital, Ankara, and President Recep Tayyip Erdogan re-emerged in Istanbul. By the next day, hundreds were dead, and thousands of military personnel were rounded up as the coup faltered.

The coup attempt seems to have been decisively quashed, with nearly 6,000 military personnel in custody. Funerals for many of the at least 265 people who died in clashes were taking place across Turkey on Sunday.

Now the country is left to consider what the lasting consequences of the uprising will be. While Mr. Erdogan has clearly fended off a coup, the most urgent question is this: Has he emerged even more powerful, or is he now a weakened leader who must accommodate his opponents?

That much of the country, including those who have bitterly opposed his government, stood against a military coup as a violation of democracy has raised hopes that Mr. Erdogan will seize the moment to reach across Turkey’s many political divides and unite the country.

Yet as the weekend progressed, it was becoming clearer that the moment was for Mr. Erdogan and his religiously conservative followers, a triumph of political Islam more than anything else.

While secular and liberal Turks generally opposed the coup, it was Mr. Erdogan’s supporters who flooded the streets and gathered at Istanbul’s airport Saturday morning to push out the occupying army, yelling religious slogans and chants in support of Mr. Erdogan, not democracy itself.

After Mr. Erdogan’s speech on Saturday, thousands of his supporters marched down Istiklal Street in Istanbul to Taksim Square, waving Turkish flags and shouting in support of their president.

Map | Turkey

It felt like a rollicking street carnival. Women in headscarves filled the square, a truck played a song about Mr. Erdogan, and passing motorists honked and waved flags.

That they were able to gather in public at all was significant, ample evidence that Turkey is, these days, for Mr. Erdogan and his supporters.

When other groups, like gay and lesbian organizations or labor unions, try to gather in public spaces in central Istanbul, the streets are sealed off. Armored vehicles with water cannons suddenly materialize, as do police officers with tear gas canisters.

“It was nice here today,” said Ali Tuysuz, 19, who was selling watermelon slices on Saturday in Taksim. “People are happy and buying watermelon. My tray was emptied three times. President Erdogan will protect the country.”

The mosques’ role in mobilizing citizens to gather in the streets as the coup was unfolding was decisive, but it nonetheless unsettled many secular Turks, who called it a historic sidestep of Turkey’s secular principles, in which religion is meant to be separate from politics.

On Sunday, Turkey’s nearly 85,000 mosques, in unison, blared from their loudspeakers a prayer traditionally recited for martyrs who have died in war and called for people to continue to rally against the plotters of the coup.

Interactive Feature | Tumult in Turkey: More Coverage

“Most of the people who went out in the streets to oppose the coup d’état did not use democratic language,” said Ozgur Unluhisarcikli, the director of the Ankara office of the German Marshall Fund of the United States, a research organization.

“There are people for whom Islam plays a big role in their lives in Turkey,” he added. “And there are people for whom Islam plays no role.”

As Turks waited to see in which direction their mercurial and powerful leader would steer the country in the wake of the coup attempt, Mr. Erdogan on Sunday struck some conciliatory notes. Yet he has also, in the aftermath of the plot, raised the possibility that Turkey would reinstate the death penalty, which it had abolished as a part of its pursuit to join the European Union.

“If they have guns and tanks, we have faith,” said Mr. Erdogan, who also attended a funeral of a friend who was killed, and was seen crying. “We are not after revenge. So let us think before taking each step. We will act with reason and experience.”

Nigar Goksel, a senior Turkey analyst for the International Crisis Group, said there were two possible scenarios going forward. “Either Erdogan utilizes this incident to redesign institutions in Ankara to his own benefit,” she said, “or he takes the opportunity with the solidarity that was extended to him by the opposition and different segments of society to reciprocate by investing more genuinely in rule of law and legitimate forms of dissent.”

Mr. Erdogan’s own history suggests the latter possibility is unlikely. Each time he has faced a challenge to his power, from street protests three years ago to a corruption investigation that went after his inner circle, he has sidelined his enemies and become more autocratic. Already, even as the government has arrested thousands of soldiers and officers who allegedly took part in the failed coup, there were signs that it was using the moment to widen a crackdown on perceived enemies. Alongside the military, the government also dismissed thousands of judges, who seemingly had no role to play in a military revolt.

“Now the government has a free hand to design the bureaucracy as they like, and they will,” Mr. Unluhisarcikli said. “All in all, Turkey will become a country where power is more consolidated and dissent will be more difficult.”

As the purge of the military continued on Sunday, one of those arrested was Gen. Bekir Ercan Van, the chief of the Incirlik Air Base, from which the United States military flies missions over Iraq and Syria against the Islamic State. Over the weekend, General Van approached American officials seeking asylum but was refused, according to a person with knowledge of the matter who spoke anonymously because of the sensitive nature of the subject.

The Greek prime minister, Alexis Tsipras, told Mr. Erdogan that the government would swiftly examine asylum claims by eight Turkish officers who fled to northern Greece in a helicopter and were detained on charges of illegal entry. Turkey has demanded their extradition.

As the drama of the coup attempt played out Friday and into Saturday morning, it looked for a moment as if Mr. Erdogan was on the verge of being toppled from power. The president spoke to the nation via the FaceTime app on his iPhone, just after he narrowly escaped being captured by mutinous soldiers, who arrived in a helicopter at a seaside hotel where he was vacationing — just after he had departed.

Then, around 3:30 a.m., he landed in Istanbul, after a dangerous flight undertaken while the plotters still had fighter jets in the air — the surest sign that the revolt was failing.

But more so than his dramatic arrival at the Istanbul airport, his confident speech on Saturday on top of the bus seemed to emphatically declare that he was back in charge.

Celebrations by his supporters continued on Sunday, with jubilant crowds marching through the streets of Istanbul.

“Look around you,” one of them, Eytan Karatas, 37, a mechanic, said. “Look at these people. We are the real soldiers of this country and we have a chief.”

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The Latest: Trump campaign names staffers to help Pence – Washington Post

By Associated Press,

CLEVELAND — The Latest on the 2016 race for president (all times local):

8:05 p.m.

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign has named six staffers to manage the efforts of newly named vice presidential candidate Mike Pence.

The governor of Indiana was formally presented as Trump’s running mate Saturday, a day after Trump announced the choice on Twitter.

The Pence campaign staff, with Nick Ayers as senior adviser, will manage day-to-day operations for Pence and work with the remainder of the Trump campaign team.

Campaign Chairman Paul Manafort welcomed the new members of the campaign staff and praised Pence as “a man of impeccable character.”

Others on the campaign team are manager of vice presidential operations Marty Obst; policy director Josh Pitcock; press secretary Marc Lotter; adviser KellyAnne Conway; and communications adviser Marc Short. The campaign says it will continue to expand its team for the general election in coming days.

___

7:30 p.m.

Mike Pence got choked-up when he arrived home to a cheering crowd celebrating his addition to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign.

The Indiana governor turned presidential running mate returned in a private jet Saturday evening and told those assembled at a hangar that the last few days had been “pretty overwhelming.”

Pence thanked individual members of his family during a short address and asked for prayers. The Republican vice presidential candidate told the crowd that Trump is a good man who will be a “great president.”

Divisive social issues have been a hallmark of Pence’s tenure as governor. He told the crowd that he would take “Hoosier ideals to Washington” if elected.

___

6:10 p.m.

Now officially part of Donald Trump’s presidential ticket, Mike Pence arrived back home in the style of his new boss.

The theme music from the movie “Air Force One” blared over loudspeakers as a plane carrying Pence pulled up to a hangar at a suburban Indianapolis airport on Saturday evening, mirroring Trump’s trademark campaign rally entrance.

But the similarities stopped there, as Pence spoke to the crowd from a podium with no campaign sign attached and for just a few minutes.

The newly minted vice presidential candidate said he and his wife Karen will “cherish the Hoosier homecoming” for the “rest of our lives,” and he asked attendees of the homecoming rally to pray for his family in the coming months.

He then asked the crowd to vote for Trump for the sake of the nation’s servicemen and women, for hardworking Americans and a Supreme Court that will “uphold our Constitution.”

Trump formally introduced Pence as his running mate on Saturday in New York. Pence says he and his family planned to cap their big day with a Saturday evening “pizza night” at the Indiana governor’s residence.

___

5:55 p.m.

Several hundred people are gathered in a suburban Indianapolis airplane hangar, waiting for Gov. Mike Pence to arrive back home in Indiana after his formal debut as Donald Trump’s running mate.

A handful of state lawmakers and elected officials are among the crowd at the “Welcome Home” rally, including Indiana congresswoman Susan Brooks and the state’s outgoing U.S. senator, Dan Coats.

The less-than-half-full hangar is devoid of any campaign signs or other hints that Pence is now a part of the Republican presidential ticket, aside from the music. Trump campaign rally standards by the Rolling Stones and Elton John are playing on a loop as the crowd waits for Pence, who is running about an hour late.

___

1:20 p.m.

A Montana lawmaker has resigned as a delegate to the Republican National Convention over the GOP’s position on the transfer of federal lands to states.

Republican U.S. Rep. Ryan Zinke told The (Billings) Gazette that he still plans to give a speech Monday to the convention about national security. But he says he’s withdrawing as a delegate because the GOP platform is “more divisive than uniting.”

The party’s platform committee this past week endorsed draft language that calls on Congress to pass legislation that would shift some federally controlled public lands to the states.

This has been a major issue in Montana’s House race. Zinke says he supports better management but not transfer to the states.

A reserve Montana delegate will have to be appointed to replace him.

___

12:45 p.m.

Hillary Clinton will promise to introduce an amendment overturning Citizens United, the Supreme Court ruling that opened the door to a flood of corporate and union spending in politics.

Her campaign says the Democratic presidential candidate will make her announcement in a video shown on Saturday to liberal activists meeting at the annual Netroots Nation conference in St. Louis.

The 2010 decision has become a rallying cry for those seeking to limit the influence of money in politics. The ruling led to the rise of Super PACs and boosted the effect of nonprofit spending. Both groups can now accept unlimited donations.

Overturning the decision was a key plank in the campaign of primary rival Bernie Sanders, who refused corporate donations.

Unlike Sanders, Clinton supports Super PACs working on her behalf, saying Democrats cannot unilaterally disarm. But she’s also stressed the need to get “secret, unaccountable money” out of the political system.

___

12:10 p.m.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence has delivered a ringing endorsement of Donald Trump as he joins him as the vice presidential candidate on the Republican ticket.

Pence quickly proved comfortable using Trump’s slogan, declaring “we need to make America great again and that day begins when Donald Trump becomes the 45th President of the United States.”

Pence touted Trump’s pledges to repeal Obamacare, revive the coal industry and toughen the nation’s immigration policy. Pence did so while suggesting Hillary Clinton’s policy proposals would weaken the nation’s economy and its security.

Trump officially introduced Pence as his running mate at a low-key rally on Saturday in New York. When he brought Pence to the stage, the celebrity businessman shook his hand and patted his forearm before quickly exiting. He came back for a photo with their families at the end of the governor’s remarks.

Pence is scheduled to appear at a rally in Indiana later Saturday. Trump is not scheduled to join him.

___

11:50 a.m.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence has officially accepted Donald Trump’s offer to join him on the Republican presidential ticket.

Pence says at an announcement event on Saturday in New York that Trump “is a great man and he will make a great president of the United States of America.”

He says he was “honored” to accept the offer to join the ticket, because the country needs “strong Republican leadership” and because presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton can never be president.

___

11:40 a.m.

Donald Trump says his selection of Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his running mate is one that will help him restore manufacturing jobs nationwide and protect religious freedom.

The presumptive Republican nominee spoke for nearly a half-hour Saturday as he introduced his pick for vice president, calling Pence onto the stage at the end.

Trump touted Indiana’s falling unemployment rate and said that Pence would help his campaign and his potential administration protect the freedom of speech of religious institutions.

He also touted Pence’s family and said the governor “looks good.” He even noted that while Pence endorsed GOP rival Ted Cruz in Indiana’s primary, the governor also praised Trump as he did so.

But while Trump says Pence’s selection was partially driven by a desire to promote “party unity,” Trump took a moment to attack the so-called “Never Trump” delegates attending next week’s Republican National Convention.

He brags that they’ve been “crushed.”

___

11:30 a.m.

Donald Trump says the man who will join him on the Republican presidential ticket is a “man of character, honor and honesty.”

Trump calls Indiana Gov. Mike Pence “a solid, solid person” and is contrasting his character to what he deemed “the corruption of Hillary Clinton,” his likely Democratic opponent in the fall election.

Trump declares at an announcement event Saturday morning in New York, “What a difference between crooked Hillary Clinton and Mike Pence.”

The two men are scheduled to formally become their party’s nominees at next week’s Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Trump says he and Pence are the “the law and order candidates,” adding that his potential administration would be far tougher on both foreign and domestic terrorism than would Clinton.

___

11:20 a.m.

Donald Trump is introducing Mike Pence as his running mate, calling Indiana’s governor “his first choice” to join him on the Republican presidential ticket.

Trump spoke with Pence on Saturday morning in a ballroom of a New York City hotel, a day after first introducing his choice for vice president in a Friday morning tweet.

The billionaire businessman strode first onto the stage that featured a backdrop of 10 American flags. The event did not feature any new “Trump-Pence” signs, instead displaying the standard “Trump” podium sign.

The presumptive GOP presidential nominee was cheered by a crowd of several hundred friends and local Republicans. He said he would champion “law and order” in the wake of this week’s terror attack in France.

He says of the new Republican ticket, “we are the law and order candidates.”

___

11:10 a.m.

Hillary Clinton’s campaign is seizing on the suggestion that Donald Trump may have wavered in making his vice presidential pick.

Clinton’s campaign released a web video early Saturday highlighting the campaign’s mixed signals and Trump’s contradictory statements about where he was in the selection process in the lead-up to his announcement Friday morning of Indiana Gov. Mike Pence.

The ad’s tagline says: “Donald Trump. Always divisive. Not so decisive.”

Trump’s campaign has strongly rejected the idea Trump had second thoughts about Pence. Campaign chairman Paul Manafort says Trump “never waffled” once he made his decision.

Trump and Pence are scheduled to make their first joint appearance Saturday morning in New York.

___

10:55 a.m.

Donald Trump is poised to officially name his running mate, Indiana Governor Mike Pence.

Trump and Pence will appear at a midtown Manhattan hotel on Saturday morning. It will be their first joint appearance since Trump announced his pick of Pence on Twitter Friday morning.

Pence is a favorite among Evangelical voters and the Republican Party’s conservative base. He was picked after Trump’s days-long and unusually public deliberation process.

Aides said the two men are not expected to take questions at Saturday’s announcement event.

It will take place in the same ballroom where Hillary Clinton and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio raised eyebrows by making a racially-questionable joke during a charity event this spring.

___

10:44 a.m.

The Northeast might not be the most fertile ground for Republican candidates for national office, but New York, New Jersey and Connecticut will be front-and-center at next week’s Republican National Convention.

Delegates from those states will have prime seats to watch billionaire businessman Donald Trump accept the GOP’s nomination for president.

The delegates from Wyoming, the District of Columbia and Washington state might want to bring binoculars.

Delegates are traditionally seated based on the political importance of their state, and Trump is from New York.

Battleground states Ohio and Florida also have pretty good seats. Oddly, competitive battleground states Colorado and Virginia are in the back.

Much of the leadership of the Never Trump movement is from Colorado, so those delegates might struggle to be heard.

___

3:28 a.m.

His running mate largely unknown to the public, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is introducing Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, a steady conservative with governing experience inside and outside of Washington.

Trump and Pence will appear together Saturday morning at a midtown Manhattan hotel, an unofficial kickoff event to the Republican National Convention two days before it opens in Cleveland.

While Trump showcases his choice, Democrat Hillary Clinton’s team is already painting Pence’s conservative social viewpoints as out of step with the mainstream.

Trump chose Pence in part to ease some Republicans’ concerns about Trump’s temperament and lack of political experience. Pence’s demeanor is as calm as Trump’s is fiery and he brings a sense of discipline that aides and advisers hope can bridge that gap.

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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