Keeping soldiers safe from drones through programmable ammunition – sUAS News

Winter 2017 – coalition forces, aid groups and reporters in Iraq are harassed by commercial drones used by ISIS to spread fear. Lacking effective countermeasures against what was potentially flying IEDs, they are forced to flee from the simple and cheap commercial drones, causing widespread disruption. However, in part thanks to a new technology from Nammo, that threat may become a thing of the past.

Known as ‘programmable ammunition’, this new technology makes it possible for any larger gun to fire shells that can be programmed to explode with pinpoint accuracy, either before, above or inside a target. Adaptable to several weapon platforms, including 40 mm grenade launchers, 30 mm guns, 120 mm tank ammunition and M-72 rockets, this makes the technology ideal for dealing with a number of different threats, including drones. With the first versions already combat proven and in production, the technology offers three distinct benefits – low collateral damage, flexibility and ease of installation – together delivering a significant and reliable advantage to its users.

Low collateral damage

One of the challenges faced by modern warfighters is the danger of collateral damage when operating near civilian infrastructure. This makes it difficult to fire regular ammunition at small aerial targets such as drones, because if they miss, the bullet or shell will just continue and eventually hit something else, potentially causing significant unintended damage. This threat is virtually eliminated with Nammo’s programmable ammunition, as it will explode where intended, independent of whether it has hit its target or not. In the case of smaller ammunition types, such as 40 mm grenades, these are designed to maximize their effect within a specific range from the point of detonation, with more limited effects beyond that. This means that as long as they are set to detonate

Read More Here...

This entry was posted in Guns & Ammunition Stocks News. Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.