“It'll Never Happen” – Until It Does! Caseless Ammunition, and Looking Back – Brief Thoughts 002 – The Fire Arm Blog (press release) (blog)

Caseless: The ammunition designer’s holy grail, and the engineer’s worst nightmare. It would obsolete the cartridge case overnight, resulting in cheaper, lighter, and more compact ammunition. Weapons would be able to carry 50, 60, or more rounds in slim, inexpensive magazines, and expel them at a rate of fire much higher than current weapons are capable of – not only because the ammunition is lighter and therefore more could be carried to feed such thirsty guns, but because the extraction and ejection cycles of the weapons themselves could be eliminated.

The G11K2 is the posterchild of what might have been.

The result is, potentially, the greatest advancement in small arms since the invention of the very self-contained cartridge it would replace. That is, if the kinks can be worked out – and what kinks there are! The problems facing caseless are so great that many consider the idea to be a dead-end, with no possible practical application for small arms. “It’ll never happen” is the mantra of many when it comes to caseless ammunition.

This post is not about caseless. Well, not directly. Instead it’s a bit of a perspective check when talking about speculative technological developments, especially those in small arms. Caseless ammunition is perhaps the poster child of these, but many other technologies receive the same chilly welcome from critics. Polymer cased composite and telescoped ammunition, flechette rounds, electrical firing, and other future firearms technologies all get dismissed as impractical wastes of time on the grounds that “if they were going to work, they would already”.

I don’t think that’s true, though, and I’ll explain why. When we think about technological development, we tend to gravitate towards the biggest discoveries and the biggest inventions. A leads to B, Einstein’s breakthoughs in physics led to the atomic bomb, a

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Chattanooga Choo Choo to get two new restaurants, distillery, beer on computerized tap [photos] – Chattanooga Times Free Press

Gallery: Chattanooga Choo Choo to get two new restaurants, distillery, beer on computerized tap

Restaurateur Allen Corey raised Chattanooga’s cocktail consciousness two years ago when he opened a new eatery at the Chattanooga Choo Choo Hotel called Stir.

Its bar boasts more than 350 brands of liquor, and its cocktails — made with hand-cut, “artisanal” ice cubes — cost around $12.

Corey plans to open another restaurant in late 2018 at the Choo Choo Hotel — but he’s not saying what kind.

“We are deep in the concept development stage, and we don’t know, yet,” said Corey, the former CEO of Craftworks Restaurants and Breweries, a multi-brand chain some 200 restaurants. “You can count on the fact that it’ll be fun.”

It’ll be a different kind of fun than the Choo Choo Hotel used to offer, before an $8 million transformation began in 2014 at the roughly 24-acre former Terminal Station, which was Chattanooga’s largest train station when it opened in 1909.

The Choo Choo keeps getting more sophisticated.

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› Hennen/Stickley Restaurant – More than 5,600 of interior square footage and up to 4,000 square feet of patio space facing Market Street, the CARTA Parking Garage and the Glenn Miller Gardens.

› Restaurant by Allen Corey of Square One – Up to 6,000 square feet of interior space to serve as the east anchor of Station Street.

› New Distillery – A new distillery that makes vodka, gin, rum and whiskey, led by industry veteran William Lee, will occupy 1,835 square feet off the historic dome lobby. An additional 370 square feet of patio space will face Glenn Miller Gardens and the iconic Chattanooga Choo Choo Locomotive.

› Land for Future Development – The Choo Choo will make available up to 2 acres of land,

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Beer to their hearts: Brewpub owners pursue their dream on Athens' westside – Online Athens

The yeast, the hops and the flavors have justified the brew and the taps are on at Akademia Brewing Company in Athens.

The Athens Area Chamber of Commerce hosted brewpub owner Matt Casey and brewmaster Morgan Wireman on Nov. 13 for an official ribbon-cutting at 150 Crane Drive off Atlanta Highway next to Georgia Square Mall.

“I appreciate the fact you guys chose this place here. This is important to this (traffic) corridor,” Athens-Clarke Commissioner Jerry NeSmith said.

NeSmith’s words were echoed by Chamber President Doc Eldridge, who said the opening of the brewpub “is a big deal for Athens.”

“This is a good incentive for others to come behind it,” he said about business opportunities on the westside.

The pub features not only their original craft beers such as Hoprodite and Noctua Chaos, but a varied menu from fish and chips to burgers and Mediterranean dishes — all created by chef Nate Eve.

Establishing a craft brewery has been a longtime goal for Casey and Wireman.

“We’ve been trying to open this for three years. We looked at about 20 different properties all over town and in Crawford,” Casey said, explaining that when they settled on the name Akademia, they knew they had to open in Athens.

“We looked at a few buildings to purchase and this was the third or fourth building that we found on the westside. We weren’t really targeting the westside, but the more we thought about it — it turned out to be a good opportunity,” he said.

The brewery, Casey said, “helps balance out this side of town,” which already has a number of well-known restaurants.

Wireman, who grew up in Oconee County, said he and a friend began homebrewing about 10 years ago, then ended up traveling to Germany for a couple

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Bowhunters enjoy big final weekend at McAlester Army Ammunition … – NewsOK.com

The last weekend of the traditional archery hunts on the McAlester Army Ammunition Plant was historic.

For the first time, two bucks on the plant’s “10 Most Wanted List” were killed on the same day.

On Nov. 11, a buck named Heartbreaker was arrowed by Joey Vaughn of McAlester and a buck named Eclipse was taken by Don Ritter of Atoka. Heartbreaker had a green score of 178 6/8, while Eclipse measured 173 4/8.

Hunters enter a drawing for a chance to hunt on the ammo plant grounds through the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation’s controlled hunts program. Only traditional archery is allowed on six consecutive weekends in the fall.

The plant has always publicized its “10 Most Wanted” list, but it doesn’t necessarily represent the 10 biggest bucks on the grounds, said Ryan Toby, natural resources manager at the plant.

It’s a list of impressive bucks that have been seen by plant personnel during the year, he said.

Heartbreaker earned its name because its main beams curve down and resemble a heart when seen from the front, Toby said. Eclipse was first spotted this summer at the time of the solar eclipse, he said.

In addition to Heartbreaker and Eclipse, six other bucks taken by bowhunters last weekend will qualify for Pope & Young and a total of 38 deer were harvested, Toby said.

“We hit the rut pretty hard last weekend,” he said.

Every hunter who harvests a deer at the plant gets to bury a rock in the campground to commemorate the accomplishment, Toby said.

“We kind of got a mini-Stonehenge going on down here,” he said.

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50 years later, CSU's 'beer-in' legacy lives on – My Windsor Now

FORT COLLINS — Doug Phelps wore a suit and tie for pictures.

His light hair was always neatly cut and combed. Camera flashes bounced off the thick lenses of his black, plastic-rimmed glasses.

At Colorado State University, he was the student who asked professors to mail him his final grades — on a postcard — at the end of each semester. He couldn’t wait for report cards.

He didn’t drink, either. Not even beer.

But in the fall of 1968, in front of 3,000 fellow classmates piled into CSU’s student center grand ballroom, Phelps stood behind a podium, cracked open a Coors and held it to his lips.

The moment would go down in CSU history as the famed “drink-in” or “beer-in,” which set changes into motion on a conservative campus that now embraces its town’s exploding beer culture.

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Nearing its 50th anniversary, the story is still retold. Pictures of Phelps at the beer-in were recently shared on CSU’s Alumni Association’s Facebook page.

“Coors Banquet paved the way!” one commenter said.

For Phelps, that day was always about more than beer.

It was the day he — the picture-perfect student body president — defied CSU and proved that the student activism of the 1960s had landed in Fort Collins.

He became the clean-shaven, bespectacled face of a rebellion.

THE REVOLUTION

When asked about his college activism days, Phelps chuckles.

“The dean of students (at the time), Burns Crookston … he always called the period when I was in student government, ‘the revolution,'” said Phelps, now 70 and living in Denver.

Though there were eventual protests against Vietnam and for civil rights, Colorado was a little slow to embrace issues like that, Phelps said.

The student revolution Phelps is known for focused more on CSU

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